Indentifying and Protecting Wildlife Corridors

Posts tagged ‘Jaguars’

New Video Shows Wild Jaguar in Arizona

The Center for Biological Diversity released new video today of a wild jaguar currently living in the United States, named ‘Sombra’ by students of the Paolo Freire Freedom School in Tucson. Captured on remote sensor cameras in the Chiricahua Mountains of southern Arizona, the footage shows what appears to be the same jaguar photographed in the nearby Dos Cabezas Mountains in November 2016.

“This beautiful cat has now appeared in images taken seven months apart,” said Randy Serraglio, conservation advocate with the Center. “It seems that it’s established residence in excellent habitat more than 50 miles north of the border, which is great news for jaguar recovery.”

“Our kids benefit from an educational philosophy that connects them to their world in a concrete and hands-on way,” said Tadeo Pfister, a science teacher at Paulo Freire. “They love studying these big cats, and it’s thrilling to know that they’re helping to shape a future that includes jaguars.”

The footage, shot this summer, is the first publicly released video of this jaguar. Individual jaguars’ spot patterns are unique, and biologists have compared the photographic evidence to determine that this is the same cat that was photographed last year by a camera maintained by the Bureau of Land Management.

In response to the Center’s video release, Arizona Game and Fish Department officials confirmed that Sombra is a male, based on previously unreleased photographic evidence.

Jaguars continue to move into Arizona from a small, vulnerable population in northern Mexico. Seven jaguars have been confirmed by photographs in the United States in the past 20 years, including most recently:

The jaguar named “El Jefe” by Tucson middle school students was photographed by trail cameras more than 100 times in the Santa Rita Mountains near Tucson between 2012 and 2015. Video footage of El Jefe released in February 2016 went viral and was seen by millions of people around the globe.
A male jaguar, named “Yo’ko” by students at Hiaki High School on the Pascua Yaqui reservation, has been photographed repeatedly between December 2016 and May 2017 by trail cameras in the Huachuca Mountains in southern Arizona. Yo’ko appears to have established a territory on the Fort Huachuca military reservation.
“Sombra,” which is Spanish for “shadow,” is the third U.S. jaguar detected in the past three years, originally photographed in November 2016 in the Dos Cabezas Mountains just north of the Chiricahuas.

click the link below to read the rest of the story and see video options:

Source: New Video Shows Wild Jaguar in Arizona

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Trek West trailer on Vimeo

Jaguar in northern Mexico

Jaguar in northern Mexico


Wildlife advocate John Davis trekked from Mexico to Canada along the “Spine of the Continent” to bring attention to the need for wildlife corridors.
Watch a trailer from the Trek West film by film maker Ed George here:

Trek West trailer on Vimeo on Vimeo

via Trek West trailer on Vimeo.

Seeking justice for Corazón: jaguar killings test the conservation movement in Mexico

Read the lengthly article, with lots of gorgeous photos, here:

Seeking justice for Corazón: jaguar killings test the conservation movement in Mexico.

Jaguar in northern Mexico

As iconic and well loved as the Jaguar is in Mexico, there are still those who would wantonly kill them. As the article points out however, in this case it could make the social contract with the jaguar in Mexico even stronger.