Indentifying and Protecting Wildlife Corridors

Wildlife Tracker/Monitor project

The Wildlife Tracking and Monitoring project is our “Citizen Scientist”, volunteer based wildlife monitoring program.
Read on below to find out more about it, but first, check out the Wildlands Network updated website.

The premise of our program, training volunteers in wildlife track and sign identification so that they can become “Citizen Scientists” and gather scientifically valid data, is to give support to the idea, and the reality of, wildlife corridors. Why are we so concerned with wildlife corridors? A few years ago we saw the reality of the human impact, surrounding Sandia Mt. with roads, houses, dogs, lights and other barriers to wildlife movement.
We researched, looked around for people who were working on this issue. We found out about the Tijeras Canyon Safe Passages Coalition, and the Spine of the Continent Initiative. (See Blogroll).
This inspired us to no end, to know that other people had already not only started on this work, but had done serious research and developed comprehensive plans. We especially like the one that sees the Rocky Mountains connected together in a continental scale wildlife corridor. To know that we play a critical role in this connection makes us work even harder at bringing this message to the public, and training people to help gather the nesessary data that is lacking in many scientific databases.

Add your observations here with our downloadable PDF file:

A Data sheet 2

Peter Callen, coordinator of this project: 4winged@gmail.com

Check out the volunteer qualifications here for those who want to gather scientifically valid data:  volunteer quals.

Comments on: "Wildlife Tracker/Monitor project" (1)

  1. wanted to share that here in the far north valley of Albuquerque, west of 4th and north of Alameda, coyote scat was seen for first time on a residential road … on 9/4/11 … pretty fresh – with lots of juniper berries in it, perhaps.

    and, on 9/5/11, 2 miles south and further west, close to the east bank of the Rio Grande, a coyote was crossing Rio Grande blvd heading towards the river around 8 pm.

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