Indentifying and Protecting Wildlife Corridors

Video portfolio for award-winning video storyteller Ted Grudowski

See this beautiful documentary here: Cascade Crossroads Documentary Film — Ted Grudowski
The I-90 freeway corridor in Washington state is being re-built over Snowqualamie Pass with a massive wildlife corridor in mind. Animals moving north/south in the Cascade Mountain Range are being considered from bears and cougars to fish and invertebrates; and multiple bridges, tunnels and underpasses are being built over the next 10 years to facilitate their safe passage across this major east/west freeway.

Advertisements

See the good things these folks are doing for wildlife at: Source: Wyoming Migration Initiative

As the drought deepens, your observations of how that is affecting you and the environment can be recorded and shared here: Source: CoCoRaHS – Community Collaborative Rain, Hail & Snow Network

You can contact us at: Prairie Dog Pals PO Box 14235 Albuquerque, NM 87191 505-296-1937 prairiedogpals@prairiedogpals.org or prairiedogpals@comcast.net Email this page

Source: Contact PDP – Prairie Dog Pals

Its that time of year, Priarie Dogs are emerging from their burrows and open for business!  Please support your local burrow, as these little guys support life all up and down the food chain.

2nd year of W.O.N.

Pathways is starting its second year of contributing wildlife photo data to the Wildlife Observers Network: Source: Pathways: Wildlife Corridors of NM | WON

The W.O.N. network is a project of the UC Davis road ecology dept. who is studying wildlife corridor protection effects on preventing animal/human tragedies where these animal movement corridors intersect with roads and highways.

The New Mexico Dept. of Transportation (NM DOT) has placed Wildlife Corridor signage on the north end of Sandia Mt. alerting motorists to a 9 mile stretch of highway that cuts through widlife movement corridors to and from Sandia Mt.

Pathways has been gathering data on the types of animals who live here on the north end of Sandia Mt. since 2007, and with motion activated cameras since 2015.  We are adding cameras and the volunteers to check them, vet the memory cards, archive the data, and post some of the best ones (along with contributions from other local camera volunteers) to the W.O.N. website, see link above.  Contact us to join our dedicated people who are learning about our wild relatives who live here with us in New Mexico.

Thank You!

Thank you everyone for your renewed memberships and donations to Pathways!

If you would still like to be a supporting member of Pathways or make a donation, you can via PayPal on our website:Contact Us/Donate | Pathways: Wildlife Corridors of New Mexico or by sending a check to:

Pathways
P.O. Box 305
Placitas, NM 87043

What we do for wildlife:

1. We gather scientifically valid, research grade data on our local animals to help validate and document their existence. We focus on the larger animals; black bears, mule deer, mountain lions, elk, pronghorn, and bobcats, but we gather information and document the little guys too, as well as birds, insects, and reptiles.

2. We help people live with, rather than kill, their wild neighbors. We give talks, write articles, respond to emailed questions, host a website, and train volunteers in wildlife track and sign identification.

How you can help us, and our wild relatives:

1. Renew your membership/make a donation! It really does help us!

2. Send us your animal stories/sightings, this really helps them! You can send to me at 4winged@gmail.com or directly to: iNaturalist.org · Pathways

3. Drive slowly in Placitas! and watch out for your wild neighbors.

Thank You! from all of us at Pathways: Wildlife Corridors of NM

Bear food survey 2017

Pathways Mast Surveys Summary 2017

This year Pathways volunteers conducted 8 mast surveys between May 6th and Sept. 23rd, 2017. We surveyed areas mainly on the north end of Sandia Mt. in cooperation with the Sandia Mt. Bear Collaborative, who were conducting mast survey across the rest of Sandia Mountain. Pathways mast survey volunteers included team leaders Peter Callen and Stephanie Long and survey team members Ross Phillips, Mark Bundy, Cameron Weber, Ian Daitz, Elaine Sullivan, Renee Robillard, Jean Roberts, Michael Scialdone, and Cathy Langfelt.
This year we included gathering bear scat for a dietary analysis, but no bear scat was found by our Pathways teams.

The main mast species of Piñon Pine, One-Seed Juniper, and Gambel’s Oak had Juniper berries as the most successful crop this year, with moderate to poor acorn production, and a mast failure of Piñon nuts. These surveys covered the north end of Sandia Mt. from the Piedra Lisa trail to Del Agua Cyn., the Agua Sarca trail from Tunnel Sprgs. up to 7,800’ elevation, Las Huertas Cyn. from Placitas up to the U.S.F.S. picnic area, Palomas Peak trail, Faulty trail from the Sandia Man Cave up 3 miles, and several areas off of Hwy. 165 at higher elevations including Media Cyn., Balsam Glade, and then up the Crest highway to Ellis trail at 10,000’+ elevation.
Dozens of miles of trails were walked while we observed trees and plants along the trails, as well as surveying piñon cone and juniper berry production from a distance with binoculars. Hundreds to thousands of trees and other plants would be closely observed on each of the surveys.

Gamble’s Oak had poor to moderate acorn production, the best areas being near Las Huertas Creek and springs along the Piedra Lisa trail. Wavy leaf oaks had moderate production in the lower elevations (~6,000’+) of Piedra Lisa trail and Las Huertas Cyn.
Piñon Pine trees did not produce new cones this year, and the small cones for next year mostly dried up and died in the hot, dry months of June and July. August was our only real month of moisture and cooler temps., and that helped the One-Seed Juniper production. The Juniper berries started out abundant again this year, especially at the lower (~6,000’) elev., but the summer drought kept them small and thinned out overall production from abundant down to moderate. The rains of August helped plump up and save the Juniper berry crop. September was unusually dry for almost the whole month, but then the last 4 days brought heavy rain. By this time of the year though it was almost too late to actually have an effect other than prolong what was left of the harvest and bring back a little green up of the mature grasses and forbs.

Other soft mast species had very mixed results, with fairly poor to moderate Chokecherry and Oregon Grape production; moderate and fairly good bear corn production; a moderate to good grass and forb production at higher elev. (7,500’ +); and abundant Prickly Pear Cactus production at lower elev. (~6,000’). Banana Yucca was poor however, as were the Currants, Gooseberries and Snowberries. Lower elev. fruit orchards had mixed success as well, with some areas having poor apple and peach production, while other areas had a moderate fruit crop.

So overall it wasn’t a great year for bear foods on Sandia Mt., and bears did come down into the human habitation zone starting in August and continued to raid bird feeders, trash cans and fruit orchards throughout September. The Juniper berry and Cactus fruit were the most abundant mast, with some patches of moderate acorn and bear corn production. Grass and forb production was good at higher elevations, but Fir tree mortality was high in Las Huertas Cyn. and some eastern side canyons. A huge explosion of Tussock Moth caterpillars were everywhere on the dying Fir trees from July into September.