Indentifying and Protecting Wildlife Corridors

Read the details here, and send a message to the President encouraging him to designate this monument before he leaves office, thank you!

Source: Wildlands Network

A new overpass, and an associated underpass, just for wildlife, has opened north of Tucson, AZ.  

Source: $9.5 million bridge just for wildlife opens near Tucson

Like the ABQ Wildlife Federation here in New Mexico, these volunteer groups in Arizona are using rocks to build well designed structures, slowing down water run-off and preventing soil erosion, which in turn builds up soil and supports vegetation for wildlife.

Early last Saturday under already sweltering conditions, a half-dozen men and women heaved bread loaf-sized rocks into a large drainage on the outskirts of the Patagonia Mountains to create a “Zuni bowl”, a rock structure designed to prevent soil erosion.

Read the full article here:

Source: Volunteers lay foundation for habitat restoration | Local News Stories | nogalesinternational.com

19 June, 2016 – Rising temperatures will force wild creatures to seek cooler refuges – but safe routes for them to migrate may be scarce, scientists say.

Kind of stating the obvious, but even with “41%” connectivity rating in the west, that is still under half of the land that has reasonable connected pathways for wildlife throughout the western U.S. Not enough when you really see how loss of habitat connectivity impacts most “walking, sliding or crawling” species, and even the ones that can fly, as they need habitat connectivity too. When flights become too long or too stressful, even the birds can and have been impacted by climate change and habitat loss.

Read the article here:

Source: US wildlife needs corridors to escape heat – Climate News NetworkClimate News Network

Global temperature records were broken yet again in April for the 12th consecutive month, the longest such streak in the 137-year record of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Overall, 13 out of the 15 highest monthly temperature departures in the record have all occurred since February 2015. NOAA said the combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces for April 2016 was 1.10°C (1.98°F) above the 20th century average of 13.7°C (56.7°F) – the highest temperature departure for April since global records began in 1880. This value surpassed the previous record set in 2010 by 0.28°C (0.50°F). The global analysis from NOAA confirmed the findings of separate datasets from NASA and the Japan Meteorological Administration.

Source: April continues record temperature streak | World Meteorological Organization

We organized another wildlife track and sign identification course with renown wildlife specialist Casey McFarland on April 9th and 10th.  He will be in the area this summer and would like to do more courses, so get on our wait list and I’ll keep you posted.

Here is some feedback from a couple of the latest participants:

From Michael Cox ~ The weekend was terrific!  Casey taught me a new way of looking at the natural world.  It was like suddenly realizing that you’ve been living in the dark and having the light turned on.  It was intimidating and challenging but I’d do it again next weekend if I could, and I hope that Casey does another session sometime soon.

I am interested in your project, but I should tel you that I only received a 68 in the course, and reached some astoundingly stupid conclusions, so I’m not sure how much help I could be. So please alert me when you go out next time.

PS- Thanks for the heads up on the course, I wouldn’t have missed it for the world.

and from Sarah and Matt Fontaine ~Hi Peter,

Matt and I both thoroughly enjoyed the weekend, and got so much out of it!  I have been looking at tracks, and books of tracks, for a while… it was so satisfying to have someone with extensive knowledge to give hard facts to what had previously been questionable deduction.  And Casey showed us animal sign that I would have walked right past, not knowing what to look for.  We also appreciate the style of teaching: having us try to figure out what a track/sign is using whatever knowledge and common sense we have, before just telling us.  That really gets one looking around, analyzing the surroundings, asking questions like ‘who would live here?’ or ‘what size animal would make that scat?’

We are interested in volunteering for the Pathways monitoring program, do keep us posted!

April 16th was the first “Citizen Science Day”, but fortunately its a long celebration that lasts till May 21st!  So pick up and pitch in to help gather data and enrich our knowledge of the natural world.

Thanks for volunteering your time and effort!