Indentifying and Protecting Wildlife Corridors

Archive for the ‘Photos – Habitat’ Category

Keystone Species protectors:  Prairie Dog Pals

You can contact us at: Prairie Dog Pals PO Box 14235 Albuquerque, NM 87191 505-296-1937 prairiedogpals@prairiedogpals.org or prairiedogpals@comcast.net Email this page

Source: Contact PDP – Prairie Dog Pals

Its that time of year, Priarie Dogs are emerging from their burrows and open for business!  Please support your local burrow, as these little guys support life all up and down the food chain.

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First-of-its-Kind Lawsuit Seeks Legal Rights for the Colorado River | Earth Island Journal 

Case could establish foothold for rights of nature in American courts, say activists

Source: First-of-its-Kind Lawsuit Seeks Legal Rights for the Colorado River | Latest News | Earth Island Journal | Earth Island Institute

and without the rights of nature, where are we? This article is about the future of humanity. I think it rests on recognizing the legal rights of “non-humans”. Corporations are legally considered “persons”, so why not extend that legal protection, respect, and standing to all living and “non-living” things?

Additionally, we keep discovering that the things we can’t see, the immaterial, the “dark matter/energy”, the intangible, actually are, in their glorious way beyond words, are what really make up the vast majority of reality.

New Video Shows Wild Jaguar in Arizona

The Center for Biological Diversity released new video today of a wild jaguar currently living in the United States, named ‘Sombra’ by students of the Paolo Freire Freedom School in Tucson. Captured on remote sensor cameras in the Chiricahua Mountains of southern Arizona, the footage shows what appears to be the same jaguar photographed in the nearby Dos Cabezas Mountains in November 2016.

“This beautiful cat has now appeared in images taken seven months apart,” said Randy Serraglio, conservation advocate with the Center. “It seems that it’s established residence in excellent habitat more than 50 miles north of the border, which is great news for jaguar recovery.”

“Our kids benefit from an educational philosophy that connects them to their world in a concrete and hands-on way,” said Tadeo Pfister, a science teacher at Paulo Freire. “They love studying these big cats, and it’s thrilling to know that they’re helping to shape a future that includes jaguars.”

The footage, shot this summer, is the first publicly released video of this jaguar. Individual jaguars’ spot patterns are unique, and biologists have compared the photographic evidence to determine that this is the same cat that was photographed last year by a camera maintained by the Bureau of Land Management.

In response to the Center’s video release, Arizona Game and Fish Department officials confirmed that Sombra is a male, based on previously unreleased photographic evidence.

Jaguars continue to move into Arizona from a small, vulnerable population in northern Mexico. Seven jaguars have been confirmed by photographs in the United States in the past 20 years, including most recently:

The jaguar named “El Jefe” by Tucson middle school students was photographed by trail cameras more than 100 times in the Santa Rita Mountains near Tucson between 2012 and 2015. Video footage of El Jefe released in February 2016 went viral and was seen by millions of people around the globe.
A male jaguar, named “Yo’ko” by students at Hiaki High School on the Pascua Yaqui reservation, has been photographed repeatedly between December 2016 and May 2017 by trail cameras in the Huachuca Mountains in southern Arizona. Yo’ko appears to have established a territory on the Fort Huachuca military reservation.
“Sombra,” which is Spanish for “shadow,” is the third U.S. jaguar detected in the past three years, originally photographed in November 2016 in the Dos Cabezas Mountains just north of the Chiricahuas.

click the link below to read the rest of the story and see video options:

Source: New Video Shows Wild Jaguar in Arizona

Supporting Wildlife

Supporting wildlife is like saying you support rain clouds in the desert. Yes, I support rain clouds coming over and giving us rainfall, I support water, and sunlight. I support green, green grass and clover. I support rivers full of water, skies full of sun and clouds and color, and I support the forest full of trees.  I support the wind blowing gently, especially the cool, wet breezes of summer. I support the snow burying  the mountains in winter.  Again, the water, yes I support that.  I support birds flying by, and birds landing and making nests. I support all the animals, and especially the ones that begin with the letter “B”.  Like Bats and Bears, Beavers and Bobcats, Bees and Butterflies.  I support the Moon and the Stars, the Planets too, and Sun in Sky and the light that reaches Earth. I support the fog that fills the valleys on a winter day, and pine needles that collect under the pine trees. I support holes and other burrows in the ground, and sound of rain on a metal roof. 

Wild lands

Wild land, what is it?

Is it pristine land, untouched by humans? Is its value derived from its pristine (untouched) state? Maybe this has been the most popular public notion of what wilderness is, but now we’re realizing the functionallity of wild land is so important for many reasons that affect us directly.  One reason, is that functional, wild land doesn’t cost us anything to maintain – it is this cost of maintaining our built environment that is the root of the word “sustainable”. So we are learning what costs are incured by removing components of wild lands, or by diminishing, altering, re-arranging, changing the percentages of components, or altering dynamic processes (floods, fires).

These components include animal life, plant life, soil life and geology, water (surface) saturation, rainfall, ground water, rivers (acequia, canal and dam systems), lakes, fire cycles, air quality (pollution by particulates, NOx, acid rain, elevated CO2), and other micobiotic and fungal relationships that we are as yet unaware of.  

Wilderness as a mental state has also been valued and is important, again, just knowing that there is a pure land, untouched and beautiful, a virgin – this mental state then releases our stress of seeing all the abused, degraded and “raped” lands all around us.  

Also as a place to physically go for recreation and relaxation, the stress releiving properties are used in this way too: backpacking, camping, day hiking and even motor touring through national parks and wilderness areas.  

Then there is the monetary value of fishing, hunting and outfitting/guiding that provides economy and livelihood for people as well.

But the cost of human landscapes, and lack of cost of wild ones, is something that is not usually recognized. This cost of the human landscape is actually considered part of the economy, and is planned for and included in the GDP.  However, it is not considered an unaffordable cost.

The price of doing business – it gets higher all the time, with every acre of wild land that is altered. The cost/benefit analysis, as we know, does not take into account the costs of: restoring nature, restoring natural balances (removing invasive species, controlling disease vectors, mental health care, pollution of: air, water, biota, soil, bacteria and fungus, and overpopulation of humans and under/overpopulation of biotic communities).  

We usually talk about human overpopulation, and wildlife extinction or underpopulation, but we don’t usually speak of or recognize animal and plant (and microbal) overpopulation. Some obvious ones: white-tailed deer, insects, etc., but almost all environments are full of overpopulated species, and again, invasives are obvious, but not so the natives in overpopulation, including forests and shrub lands. We just don’t see all the imbalance in nature, we call it “normal” or “natural” and thats the end of it.  I would like to see this change.

I would also like to see functioning “wild” lands respected for the cost saving, life giving places they are.  

I would like to see the true cost of doing business calculated. That being shown, “transparent” they call it, business as usual may not be done. That may violate the “Limited Liability” of the corporation.  Maybe we need a “Fully Liable” corporation, who would sign up for that?  Wether we sign up for it or not, it is the reality of living on Earth. Ultimately, we are all “fully liable” for how we live, for how we treat this gift of life.  

There has always been a cost of doing this business of living, the question is, can we any longer afford “the way of plunder”?

 

STOP COUGAR TRAPPING

Speak out against the proposed increase in killing Mountain Lions in New Mexico. Sign the petition here:STOP COUGAR TRAPPING.

Please sign by Sunday, August 16th!  Following the link above will take you to “StopCougarTrapping.org”, where you can download a PDF of the petition to share.  

Thank you for signing and making your comments to protect the Mountain Lion from needless slaughter.  

Never seen a Mountain Lion?

Mt. Lion, glass door, housecat

 

Well how about from the comfort of your living room?  This is a truly remarkable video of a Mountain Lion playing , or wanting, but certainly interacting with, a house cat. Lets just say this family’s children will not be playing outside unsupervised any more.

Cat in face-off with mountain lion – BBC News.

Mountain Lion/human interactions are on the increase, and the more we understand about the ecological role of these top carnivores, the better. The better for us, the Mountain Lions, the deer, and all the myriad interactions that ensue from the presence of a top carnivore, designed to cull the weak, the sick, and (ulp) the young.  Of course healthy deer populations are our best ally when we live in Mountain Lion territory, as Deer, Elk, rabbits and other small animals are what Mountain Lions have evolved to eat, not humans.  

 

 

Cat in face-off with mountain lion – BBC News.